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VMB-413 Squadron Insignia

Marine Bombing Squadron Four-Thirteen

 

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM: PAGE 1

VMB-413 Group Photograph

SQUADRON PHOTOGRAPH: VMB-413, taken on 10 November 1943 at MCAS Edenton, North Carolina.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Bill Tucker)

LOW-LEVEL RUN: Over the coastal plains of eastern North Carolina, a VMB-413 PBJ make a low-level pass.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Bill Tucker)

PERFECT LANDING: MB-52 makes a beautiful landing at MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Bill Tucker)

TRAINING HOP: An unidentified VMB-413 PBJ on a training flight.  Although the location is not known, it was most likely taken over eastern North Carolina.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Bill Tucker)

PBJ at Edenton

MCAS EDENTON: A PBJ at MCAS Edenton, North Carolina on 10 November 1943.  It appears that the ground crew is preparing to tow the aircraft to the flight line area.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Bill Tucker)

PBJ-1D Headed Home

MB-53: A VMB-413 PBJ in flight, taken at an unknown location.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Bill Tucker)

USS KALININ BAY: On January 3, 1944, VMB-413 sailed for Hawaii embarked aboard the USS Kalinin Bay (CVE-68).

Photograph: U.S. Navy Historical Archives

LONG WAY FROM HOME: In January 1944, VMB-413 arrived at Oahu after completing the first leg of their deployment to the Southwest Pacific.  As this sign indicates, they were 2,100 miles away from the continental United States and had about another 4,000 miles to go.

Photograph: Courtesy of Paul Corey

BOMBS AWAY: A VMB-413 PBJ releases its lethal load of 500lb general purpose bombs.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Bill Tucker)

PBJ-1J: This aircraft is a PBJ-1J that has been modified by removing the standard Plexiglas-covered bombardier's station and replacing it with a solid nose sporting eight .50 caliber machine guns.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Janet Nickerson)

BRIEFING: First Lieutenant Frederick J. Helling gives his crew a last-minute brief on their upcoming mission prior to boarding their aircraft.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Carol Clark)

BOMB RUN: A flight of VMB-413 PBJ on a bomb run over Japanese facilities on Vunakanau, New Britain in March of 1945.  Vunakanau is located on the same island and near Rabaul Harbor.

Photograph: Courtesy of Carol Clark

HUNG BOMB: This photograph is believed to show a PBJ, piloted by Major Norman R. Nickerson, that has just returned from a mission with a hung bomb.  A hung bomb always presented a very dangerous situation as a rough landing could have resulted in the bomb detonating.  Notice the interest of the ground crew as they all hurry towards the aircraft's bomb bay.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Janet Nickerson)

JUST A LITTLE BROAD: This aircraft displays nose art and is yet another example that dispels the myth that PBJs lacked any form of such markings.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Carol Clark)

SALVO: Over an unidentified Japanese target, a PBJ-1D of VMB-413 salvos it bomb load.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Bill Tucker)

LOSS OVER TOBERA: With its port engine hanging following an anti-aircraft hit, the PBJ of First Lieutenant Glenn W. Smith (BuNo 35143) goes down over Tobera on 5 May 1944.  The aircraft crashed a short time later killing all seven of the crew.  The aircraft's wreckage was located in 1949 and the remains of at least one crewmen was recovered and returned to the United States for burial at Arlington National Cemetery.  During the late 1990s the site was rediscovered and yielded additional  remains.  In 2000 these remains were also recovered and returned to the United States for burial.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of J.W. Leggio)

VMB-413 FRIEND: Ordnance officer, Captain Robert A. Krider, makes friends with one of the locals that inhabited the islands of the Southwest Pacific.

Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps (Courtesy of Ann N. Krider)

Grave of 1stLt Smith & Crew

GRAVE OF SMITH CREW: The grave of First Lieutenant Glenn W. Smith and his crew in Arlington National Cemetery: Corporal Ferris R. Gillen; Sergeant George D. Herbst, Jr; First Lieutenant Ralph M. Jones; Sergeant John S. Little; Corporal Michael F. Mazepa.

Photograph: Copyright 2007 Bill Tucker

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